!0 Basic Sentence Patterns Used In The English Language

There are ten sentence patterns used in the English Language. This article tells what they are and what parts of speech are in them.

Language is a fascinating thing. From the moment we are born, we begin the process of learning how to communicate. As babies, we cry. It is the only method we know of at that stage to get what we need and want. As we grow, however, we experiment with sounds and words, mimicking those around us in order to figure out a better way of expressing ourselves. We learn from our parents how to form sentences and ask questions. Little do we know at that age that we are using something called "grammar."

People use grammar without really thinking about it. They do not realize that there are ten sentence patterns, and with each sentence that they speak, they are using one of them. Grammar can be very simple, but it can also be very complex. A sentence may last for a whole paragraph, and still be grammatical.

English grammar is very different from the grammar of other languages. In English, the sentence's meaning is derived from the order of the words. For example: I threw the ball over the fence. The words in this sentence could be scrambled and it would no longer be a sentence: Fence the over ball threw I the. Our sentences have specific requirements of where certain words need to go in order to convey the meaning we wish to convey. You may be able to scramble a sentence and it would remain a grammatical sentence, but its meaning would be completely changed. 

As stated before, there are ten basic sentence patterns in the English language. They look simple, and we can speak very complicated sentences, but these patterns are like the skeletons of our sentences. These patterns have been separated into four groups: The be Patterns, The Linking Verb Patterns, The Intransitive Verb Pattern, and The Transitive Verb Patterns.

The be Patterns: Sentence patterns I-III use to be verbs.

Pattern one consists of a noun phrase, to be verb, and an adverbial of time or place: The students are upstairs.

Pattern two consists of a noun phrase, to be verb, and an adjective(subject complement): The students are diligent.

Pattern three consists of a noun phrase, to be verb, and a noun phrase(subject complement): The students are scholars.

The Linking Verb Patterns: Sentence patterns IV-V use linking verbs, verbs which are completed by a subject complement.

Pattern four consists of a noun phrase, linking verb, and an adjective(subject complement): The students seem diligent.

Pattern five consists of a noun phrase, linking verb, and a noun phrase(subject complement): The students became scholars.

The Intransitive Verb Pattern: Sentence pattern VI uses intransitive verbs. Intransitive verbs have no complement following them.

Pattern six consists of a noun phrase and an intransitive verb: The students rested.

The Transitive Verb Patterns: Sentence patterns VII-X use transitive verbs. Transitive verbs can have one or more complements following them.

Pattern seven consists of a noun phrase, transitive verb, and a second noun phrase(direct object): The students studied their assignment.

Pattern eight consists of a noun phrase, transitive verb, a second noun phrase(indirect object), and a third noun phrase(direct object): The students gave the professor their homework.

Pattern nine consists of a noun phrase, transitive verb, a second noun phrase(direct object), and an adjective(object complement): The students consider the teacher intelligent.

Pattern ten consists of a noun phrase, transitive verb, a second noun phrase(direct object), and a noun phrase(object complement): The students consider the course a challenge.

These are the ten basic sentence structures used in the English language.

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