Court of the Lions

Named after the delicately carved fountain at its center, the Court of the Lions at the Alhambra Palace in Granada, Spain is an exceptional illustration of the Hispano-Moorish architecture. The fountain, mounted at the back of twelve figurative lions is s

Named after the delicately carved fountain at its center, the Court of the Lions at the Alhambra Palace in Granada, Spain is an exceptional illustration of the Hispano-Moorish architecture. The fountain, mounted at the back of twelve figurative lions is surrounded by pavilions and neat columns.

Architecture:

The court, a 35 by 20 meter oblong, is surrounded at its fringes by a low gallery standing by 124 exquisite marble columns. The pavilion extends into the court at each of its farthest points: designed with filigree ornamentation on the walls and a light domed roofing. Coloured tiles and white marble decorated the square's pavement and the colonnade surrounding it.

The columns, 124 ornate white marbles, supported the gallery and the roof. The columns were arranged irregularly, slightly hinting on some sort of artistic effect that might have been the entire goal of its architecture to begin with. It was donned on a variety of foliage and other embellishments.

The main structure has its roots to the Persian and Isl?mic tradition. Its court was divided into four parts said to have been symbolic to each four part of this world.

The Fountain of the Lions:

Lions were unusual to be a part of the Muslim culture, much less a Muslim palace. For that the Foutain of the Lions situated at the middle of Alhambra have many legends attached to it. The fountain of the lions also bear good resemblance, or at least, some reference to the Temple of Solomon, as it was described in the Old Testament: The Books of Chronicles.

However, history suggests that even before the palace was completed, the Isl?mic isolation, portraying friendly relations with the Kingdom of Castile, and the use of figurative motifs were not that unexpected to the Nasrid art.

Alhambra:

Alhambra is the Moorish citadel formed from a complex of palaces, courtyards, gardens, and forts in Granada, Spain. The palace itself was one thing to look at, but each of its part alone has something stunning about it.

The Arabic name Alhambra literally meant "the red one," and was short for its complete form, Calat Alhambra, or the red fortress. It was erected over the top of a hill on the south-eastern border of the city: It was constructed by the Moorish Emirates of Granada, during the mid fourteenth century.

Alhambra took at least two kings to be completed: from Yusuf I (1333 - 1353) to Muhammed V (1353 -1391). The entire fort was made of red clay. It used to have been whitewashed, however today the buildings clearly have a red hue.

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DeeBee
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Posted on Oct 18, 2010