Recycling: Everything Old Can Be Reused

Why Recycle? Do we even need to bother reusing stuff when we can just throw them away? Some of these items we want to throw away can still be recycled and reused at home.

Why Recycle? Do we even need to bother reusing stuff when we can just throw them away? We, especially those of us living in industrial countries, have a reputation for producing more trash in a lifetime than the combined gross national products of several small nations. Every time you take out the trash just take a look down the street and see the amount of materials we throw away. Some of these items we want to throw away can still be recycled and reused at home.

Window shades

If your window shades become torn and tattered, salvage the wooden roller and slat. Purchase a cheap plastic tablecloth having a design that complement the room and cut it to the size of the shade. Hand-hem the bottom to fit the wooden slat and glue or staple the top to the roller. You now have an adorable custom-made shade for little money.

Pierced earrings

Lost the mate to a pair of pierced earrings? That sole earring can be a great scatter pin for cowl and turtleneck sweaters or the lapels of jackets.

Revolving tie rack

Retrieve that old tie rack and it can have a new lease on life below your kitchen sink for storing brushes, measuring spoons and other small utensils.

Empty jars

Empty grated cheese jars having shaker tops make great dispensers for baking soda when utilized as a cleanser for bathtub or sink.

Candle stubs

Candle stubs are great for "greasing" drawer runners and as pin cushions; the tallow helps pins and needles go through materials well.

Display racks

Salespeople normally toss aside display racks when substituting them with new ones. Cleaned and repainted, they make good towel racks for the bathroom.

Jumper cables

Before casting aside an old set of jumper cables, cut off the alligator clips on the ends. They may be used to hold workshop projects together.

A little squeeze

Those plastic squeeze containers that lemon and lime juice come in are handy for so a lot of things. Pry open the top and fill up with: shampoo for your children, vinegar and oil (in separate ones, of naturally) for picnic salads, hand lotion from larger-size economy bottles to hold by the kitchen sink or drinks for brown-baggers.

Bath mats

Worn bath mats that have lost their non-skid backing are great floor mops. Just fold one, fluffy side out, to match your mop handle and slip it into place. No messy strings to tangle, catch or fall away and the "mop" can be washed in the washing machine to keep it fresh and clean.

Used envelopes

Save paper and time at the checkout counter: Write your grocery list on the back of a used envelope and place redeemable coupons inside.

"Junk" mail

Flyers and announcements are often printed on one side, leaving the other side free for use as instant scratch paper. Cut sheets in half and pile them in a suitable old box. You'll constantly have a ready supply of paper to scribble down just about anything.

Register tapes

Save the wide register tape from the supermarket checkout and utilize the reverse side for the following week's shopping list.

Packing cardboards

Whether you're an accomplished cook or a budding beginner, save those 7 x 9-inch thin white cardboards used in packing women's hosiery for your very own set of recipe cards. There's lots of room for the ingredients, directions, a picture of the finished dish and the category (breads, main dishes, desserts, etc.). You may also tape recipes from newspapers and magazines on them.

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Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman
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Posted on Feb 26, 2012
Pat Bartels
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Posted on Feb 26, 2012